Feel good food goes beyond taste at Hineleban Cafe

Your coffee fix can help plant trees in Mindanao


“People ask, ‘what’s Hineleban? Is it French? Italian? And I say, no, it’s local,” says Claudia Perrine, one of the owners of Hineleban Cafe. Pointing to a framed photograph on one of the cafe’s bookshelves, she continues: “That’s your farmer right there.”

Located along Arnaiz Ave., with its wide glass windows, the cafe is hard to miss. In fact, Perrine shares, a lot of their current guests find out about them only by spotting them along the way, if not by word of mouth.

Hineleban Cafe may have just opened its doors to the public last April, but their experience in producing local, single origin coffee is a long-storied one, having been running now for eight years. Rated as one of the best arabica coffees in 2013 with a score of 85.5 (giving them a specialty coffee grade), Hineleban Cafe, and in turn its mother company Hineleban Foundation, aim to not only showcase the world-class coffee, but to also give back to the communities that produce them.

nolisoli eats restaurant hineleban cafe
Perrine shares that it was the Philippine Artisan Trade, whose gallery and bar are located directly above the cafe, that offered Hineleban Cafe its current space.
nolisoli eats restaurant hineleban cafe
Hineleban Cafe uses coffee straight from Hineleban Foundation’s coffee plantation in Bukidnon. The coffee is graded as specialty coffee.

With only 1.2 percent of primary forests left in the country—the same forests that sustain the country’s indigenous peoples (IPs)—Hineleban Foundation, and in turn the cafe as well, aims to help repopulate the forests, empower the IPs living there by giving them a share of their as well as education on proper and sustainable land practices.

Each bag of coffee bought equates to a tree planted for each customer. The customers can also name their trees and even track its growth on the Hineleban website.

nolisoli eats restaurant hineleban cafe
A number of Hineleban Cafe’s customers are also those who come for the bike and sports shop behind the cafe.
nolisoli eats restaurant hineleban cafe
The cafe offers adlai dishes that use familiar recipes. Pictured are the mushroom risotto and adlai tapa with duck egg. On the far right, a glass of iced honey process coffee.

Instead of rice, Hineleban Cafe uses adlai for their main dishes. Also produced at their Bukidnon farm, adlai was discovered as a result of the long droughts. Perrine shares, “The datu’s wife said [they had nothing to eat] because they can’t grow their crops. When asked what they ate, they showed this grain, saying ‘oh, we’re eating this adlai.’ It’s like rice.”

The adlai dishes feature simple, easy to do recipes like tapa, risotto, and curry “rice.” “That’s what we want to show. [That] this adlai we have here, you could also cook it at home and whenever you want.”

nolisoli eats restaurant hineleban cafe
nolisoli eats restaurant hineleban cafe
Other Hineleban products such as coffee beans and adlai (pictured) are available for purchase at the cafe. Turmeric and limited quantities of honey (as of this posting) are also available.

Pair a cup of honey process coffee with a bowl of tapa with adlai and flavorful duck egg for a truly local breakfast. Or go for their mushroom risotto—an unsurprisingly addicting dish with a good balance of creaminess. It comes topped with a sprinkling of parmesan cheese, adding a layer of flavor to the balance.

The choice is easy to make at Hineleban Cafe, knowing it all leads to good outcomes, for the farmers and diners alike.

TAGS: adlai coffee hineleban cafe hineleban foundation local nolisoliph