Feb 1, 2017

In Italy, coffeehouses or coffee bars are very common, serving as venues for brewing both coffee and intelligent conversations. Coffee serves as an impetus for movement and industry; people drink coffee for its immediate hard-hitting effect, after all.

The Italians are very particular with the way they drink coffee. Drip brewed coffee is not a common practice. If an Italian doesn’t have an espresso machine at home, he or she would use the ubiquitous silver Moka Espresso Maker, devised by Alfonso Bialetti in the 1930s.

Instead of going to the coffeehouse or bar, this metallic contraption brings the coffee experience to a personal level. Using pressure to make a decent batch of espresso in minutes, the distinct aroma of the espresso’s crema surrounds the air—a good start for the day.

Having this espresso maker in the household means holding a fine example of Italian craftsmanship. Its symmetrical, eight-faceted metallic design has been kept the same for more than 70 years. Its cast aluminum casing speaks of sturdiness; one need not thoroughly clean the pot as the previous brews add depth and flavor to the next. Interwoven into Italian cultural narrative, the Bialetti Moka makes a wonderful addition to the home—a piece of history, movement, and vigor.

This story was originally published in Northern Living, June 2015.

TAGS: alfonso bialetti bialetti moka coffee italian coffee moka espresso maker