Nov 20, 2020

We’ve got something important to tell you: Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (BSP) has a new logo. OK, maybe it’s not as important as today’s news of that lawmaker pushing for an extension of several provisions in the Bayanihan To Recover As One Act, or the Department of Social Welfare and Development explaining why it has P83 billion in unspent funds when people are literally begging for food. But the new logo still became the talk of the town.

On Nov. 20, the BSP revealed the new look in its official seal which will be used and implemented in phases beginning January next year. 

The new logo features a full-body image of the Philippine eagle, which was inspired by various wildlife photographs of the country’s national bird. The image of the endangered animal is rendered in gold, just like the three stars in the logo which represent the three pillars of central banking: price stability, a stable banking system and a safe and reliable payments system. These stars may also be interpreted as a representation of Luzon, Visayas and Mindanao, just like in our national flag.

“The use of the Philippine eagle in the new logo is intended to represent the BSP as well as the Filipino people which it serves,” says BSP in an official statement. It adds that the new logo was endorsed by the National Historical Commission of the Philippines prior to it being approved by the Palace this month.

However, more netizens are leaning towards the current design of the official BSP logo. Introduced in 2010, the bank’s current seal features a simple outline sketch of the Philippine eagle’s head along with the same three stars found in the new design. Its background color is also in a much lighter shade of blue, a color that signifies stability. 

Several online comments express preference for the current seal’s simplicity which makes it easier to print on documents. They also note that the intricate details in the new logo would almost be invisible when scaled down in size. Some are saying that the new logo looks more American than Filipino, while others are asking why it’s even necessary to change the logo anyway. What do you think?

 

Header photo from Inquirer.net

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TAGS: Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas logo government